Exposing PseudoAstronomy

January 16, 2014

Quadcopters Mistaken as UFOs, Redux

Filed under: skepticism,ufo — Stuart Robbins @ 4:44 am
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Short post, so I’ll dispense with the usual subject headings. Several months ago, I wrote a blog post wherein I surmised that many (not most, not all, but many) UFO reports might, in fact, be hobby “toys” (albeit expensive ones). “Toys” as in quadcopters and related flying remote controlled craft.

Numerous comments that I did not permit through were from some very ardent UFOs = aliens proponents, and others who entirely missed the point and were off-topic. Some comments that were submitted argued that no one could possibly mistake a quadcopter flying a few 10s m (~100 ft?) up with lights on the bottom as a UFO.

They are wrong.

And to show they are wrong, I provide two anecdotes. Before you scream, “anecdotes aren’t evidence!” the knee-jerk reaction in this case is wrong. The claim was made that quadcopters and related craft could not be mistaken as UFOs. Therefore any single anecdote where they are will falsify that claim.

The first example came after the second, temporally, but it’s the shortest. I was at Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia, last week, and it was night. I was waiting for the bus, while enjoying a lovely gelato (they use the word “lovely” a lot here). I looked towards the beach because I saw something odd out of my peripheral vision. I turned to see dancing lights, about five of them, hovering, moving slowly, then changing direction quickly, and generally performing acrobatic feats that certainly “no terrestrial craft could do!” Fortunately, it passed in front of a tree and so I was able to instantly recognize that it was a few meters away rather than thousands, and surmise that it was a quadcopter. I had fallen victim to the phenomenon myself.

The second anecdote is a bit more frustrating and emberassing because of what caused it. For my Australia trip, I ended up getting a DJI Phantom quadcopter because it was compact, sturdy, easy to travel with, and had a built-in holder for my GoPro camera. Unfortunately, I did not realize that there is a known issue with them suddenly deciding to fly away, no longer responding to the controller.

I was flying it the third night I was in Melbourne, just up in my friend’s sister’s tiny backyard, in the dense neighborhood of Albert Park. Was doing fine, was getting nice video and stills of sunset over the beach (~800 m away) and the city (opposite direction, several km away), when the quadcopter just darted off towards the beach. The control did not work. I’ll spare you the agonizing search and flyering and just jump to the fact that we DID get it back two days later. It landed on the garage roof of a house about 500 m (~0.3 miles) away, and the father and children recovered it about 10 minutes later. It now has my name and phone number in big characters on the hull.

But, while flyering and narrowing down where it landed based on neighbor reports, several said they thought it was a UFO. Yes, they used those initials, U-F-O. One even remarked that she had said out loud, “Wow, UFOs are real!” when she saw it flying overhead because all they could see were the green and red lights on the bottom.

So, there you have it. Again: I’m not saying that people who mistake these as aliens are stupid, that they are ignorant. Nor am I saying that every UFO sighting is a quadcopter or related craft.

However, I think that it’s very telling what happened in these two cases, and that it shows people need to be ever more careful in jumping to the UFO = aliens conclusion without considering all the much more likely – and very terrestrial – explanations.

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4 Comments »

  1. Neighbors said it was a UFO — they weren’t wrong, if they weren’t able to identify the flying object. After all, that’s what the initials mean. I agree that jumping from there to aliens is a leap too far. It’s a funny anecdote, but makes a good point at the same time.

    I hadn’t encountered “flyering” in this context before. In the past, it meant giving out flyers or campaigning for something/someone using flyers. Or even posting them in visible locations, like on lamp posts or store windows. I guess since flyers aren’t as prevalent as they used to be, that the word would be re-purposed.

    Comment by Rick K. — January 16, 2014 @ 11:47 am | Reply

    • The problem is that for too long people have been allowed to get away with “UFO automatically equals Alien Spacecraft”. I’ve seen plenty of lights in the sky I am unsure about, but I’d rather say “I don’t know what that was.” rather than “I don’t know and therefore it’s a Mothership”.

      Comment by Graham — January 25, 2014 @ 10:55 pm | Reply

  2. […] Robbins has an interesting post about how quadrocopters can (and have been) mistaken for […]

    Pingback by Quadrocopters as Mistaken UFOs — January 24, 2014 @ 5:23 pm | Reply

  3. […] Robbins has an interesting post about how quadrocopters can (and have been) mistaken for […]

    Pingback by Quadrocopters as Mistaken UFOs | UFOreligions — February 9, 2014 @ 8:05 pm | Reply


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